Data and Research 2017-11-29T13:25:22+00:00

The 2015 Annual Survey of the Mathematical Sciences in the U.S. paints a picture of women’s representation in mathematics.

As of 2015, women are…

41% of undergraduate math majors
28% of new PhDs in the US
25% of current postdocs in math
24% of tenured/tenure-stream math faculty
11% of full professors at PhD-granting institutions
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Why so few?

This 2010 report from the American Association of University Women (AAUW) presents “profiles of eight key research findings that point to environmental and social barriers — including stereotypes, gender bias, and the climate of science and engineering departments in colleges and universities — that continue to block women’s progress in STEM”.

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See the full report

It's not just about women.

The CBMS demographic survey, most recently completed in 2010, details the percentage of gender and of racial/ethnic groups among all tenured, tenure-eligible, postdoctoral, and other full-time faculty in mathematics departments of four-year colleges and universities. The data, shown below, underscore the lack of representation of many groups in the mathematical sciences.

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0%
White, male
0%
White, female
0%
Asian, male
0%
Asian, female
0%
Black, male
0%
Black, female
0%
Hispanic, male
0%
Hispanic, female
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What about other measures of representation?

A recent study tried to investigate the relative influence of women in mathematical research by surveying the editorial boards of math journals. Among 435 research journals in mathematics, women hold only 8.9% of journal editorships, compared to 15% of tenured or tenure-eligible positions in doctoral-granting mathematics departments. Fifty-one of the journals in this sample have no women editors.
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